Le Melon de Montréal

Champs

Salut et bonne année!

Dans les semaines à venir, je présenterai des projets finals de mes étudiants à McGill University dans mon cours de l’histoire de l’environnement québécois. Ce travail pose des questions important sur l’interaction entre la culture du Québec, l’environnement, et l’histoire. Comme la professeure, je suis vraiment impressionnée par l’effort et la qualité de ces projets (et de mes étudiants!), et je pense que vous serez aussi!

Pour le premier projet, Marie-Claude Delorme considère l’histoire agricole riche de la ville de Montréal avec son site web génial sur le melon de Montréal. Le site web est en français, mais pour des membres de NiCHE anglophone, Marie-Claude écrivait un sommaire en anglais :

« The goal of this web site is to give people a different way to learn about the history of the Montreal melon. These melons were incredibly popular from the end of the 19th century until the end of the World War II. They also put Montreal “on the map,” as these melons were exported to several luxury hotels in the United States and were sold at a higher price than steak!

They disappeared as the city’s population expanded and “ate” away at the surrounding farm lands, and these melons were not suited for agribusiness as they were labour intensive and needed a lot of daily care.

A journalist found old seeds for this melon in a seed bank in Iowa and took them back to Montreal. With these seeds, an organic farmer of Ile-Perrot makes the Montreal melon alive again. »

Visitez le site web et découvrir le melon de Montréal et une histoire de l’utilisation du sol et le changement : http://melondemontreal.webs.com/

Bravo Marie-Claude!

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I am a Senior Researcher at the University of Chester. My forthcoming book, A Town Called Asbestos: Environmental Change, Health, and Resilience in a Resource Community will be released by the University of British Columbia Press on 1 January 2016. My research interests are in transnational environmental health and contamination, and I always seek to blend historical research with public engagement.

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