All posts in The Otter

Lowell Demond about to release a pilot balloon at Mould Bay, 1956. Lowell Demond personal collection, reproduced with permission.

Met Techs, the Environment and Science at the Joint Arctic Weather Stations, 1947-1972

Editor’s note: This is the third in a series of posts considering the intersection between environmental history and the histories of science, technology, and medicine. Previous posts are here and here. This past […]

ASEHBallroom

#ASEH2015 Tweet Archive

If you weren’t able to attend the 2015 annual meeting of the American Society for Environmental History in Washington, D.C. last week, we’ve got you covered. In fact, the collective […]

Peter Pond, Hudson's Bay country (1784-85)

Postcards from America I

What follows is the text of what I shared with a roundtable about Environmental history and sustainability studies education at the American Society for Environmental History this year in Washington, […]

Canoe Nation image

Review of Canoe Nation

Reviewed by: David Neufeld, Independent Scholar Bruce Erickson, Canoe Nation: Nature, Race and the Making of a Canadian Icon (Vancouver: UBC Press 2013). 252 pp. $32.95 (paperback). ISBN: 9780774822497. Bruce […]

Electron microscope image of the virus responsible for measles (paramyxoviridae). Photo: 
Alain Grillet, Flickr

Vaccines and the Environmental History of Medicine

Editor’s note: This is the second in a series of posts considering the intersection between environmental history and the histories of science, technology, and medicine. The first post may be found here. In recent […]

Mounties on Roof of Canadian Embassy in Washington, D.C. Source: Connect to Canada, Flickr

Canada at ASEH 2015

This week is the 2015 annual meeting of the American Society for Environmental History and scholars from across Canada will be making the journey to Washington D.C. to share their […]

Source: UQTR-CIEQ

Base de données bibliographiques en histoire environnementale canadienne / Bibliographic Database in Canadian Environmental History

Mise à jour de la base de données bibliographiques en histoire environnementale canadienne Nous avons procédé récemment à une mise à jour de la base de données bibliographiques en histoire […]

Hobbit Hole with Snow-Boulder Shelter Wall, Fredericton, March 2015

The Cold that Binds: Ice, Climate History, and a Hobbit Hole

Canadian ice-breakers have been active in the Gulf of St. Lawrence this winter. It is a regional tradition; ice does not stop locals from traversing these northern waters. Rebecca Acton-Bond, […]

"Mercator 1569". Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Mercator_1569.png#mediaviewer/File:Mercator_1569.png

L’apport de la cartographie historique à l’étude du territoire nord-américain

Le 17 septembre 2014, une table ronde intitulée L’apport de la cartographie historique à l’étude du territoire nord-américain était organisée au Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec. Cet événement a […]

Submerged Buildings in Vanport, 1948 Source: Oregon Historical Society ; "How Oregon's Second Largest City Vanished in a Day," Smithsonian.org

#EnvHist Worth Reading: February 2015

Every month I carefully track the most popular and significant environmental history articles, videos, audio, and other items making their way through the online environmental history (#envhist) community. Also check […]

Indian Village below Shuswap, 1911. Source: Library and Archives Canada

“They have stolen our lands and everything on them”: A Century’s-Old Assertion of Indigenous Land and Resource Rights in the BC Interior

Scholarly generosity is a wonderful thing. Recently a generous senior scholar referred me to a document I hadn’t yet encountered in my research, but which has proved both relevant to […]

Horseshoe Falls in February 2013. Daniel Macfarlane

An (Ice) Bridge to the Past: Niagara Falls has Frozen

Niagara Falls has frozen. Well, not really. The entire water flow of the famous Horseshoe Falls doesn’t actually freeze, despite ‘polar vortexes’ (more commonly known to most Canadians as ‘winter’). Water […]