Canadian Environmental History at ASEH 2023

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From March 22-26 the American Society for Environmental History will hold its annual meeting in Boston.

For your convenience, we present a round-up of all the Canadian content being presented at the meeting, as well as content being presented by scholars based in Canada. If we have missed your panel or roundtable, please leave us a comment and we will make sure to add you to the list.

Thursday, March 23

Climate History and Large Lakes
8:30 to 10:00am, Hilton Boston Back Bay, Floor: Second, Maverick A

Climate Anomalies, Floods, and their Challenges in the East African Great Lakes, past to present from the 19th to the 21st Century
Philip Gooding, McGill University

Adapting to Lake Ontario’s Changing Climate during the Little Ice Age and the Anthropocene
Daniel Macfarlane, Western Michigan University

Climate History and the Future of Lake Superior Wildlife in the Anthropocene
Nancy Langston, Michigan Technology University

Food in the Anthropocene
8:30 to 10:00am, Hilton Boston Back Bay, Floor: Second, Maverick B

The Global Cuisine of Empire
Kathleen Burke, University of Toronto

Salvage Stories: Environmental and Material Histories of Reclamation
10:30am to 12:00pm, Hilton Boston Back Bay, Floor: Seventh, 7th Floor Meeting Room

Deferred Maintenance: Architectural Salvage at Funter Bay in Southeast Alaska
Desiree Amanda Valadares, UBC

Waters: Transformations and Labour
1:30 to 3:00pm, Hilton Boston Back Bay, Floor: Second, Board Room

Natural border? Human visions of the Ottawa River
Cristina Wood, York University

Extractive Colonialism in the Land of the Yinka Dene, 1871-Present
1:30 to 3:00pm, Hilton Boston Back Bay, Floor: Third, Lincoln

Consolidating Forests Under Corporate Control: Settler Colonialism and the Postwar Restructuring of Forestry in Northwestern British Columbia, Canada
Tyler McCreary, Florida State University

Failure in the Rocky Mountain Trench: Defining Homesteading Success in Northern British Columbia, 1871-1914
Daniel Sims, Tsay Keh Dene/University of Northern British Columbia

“It’s illegal to be an Indian” The ongoing effects the colonial systems has upon Indigenous peoples rights to self governance
Sabina Dennis, Caribou Clan, Dakelh

Lofty imaginings: Histories of mountain lands
1:30 to 3:00pm, Hilton Boston Back Bay, Floor: Second, Mariner

Footprints in the Snow: Steps toward a shadow history of Himalayan expeditions

Dani Kara Inkpen, Mount Allison University

“Beyond the Limits of the Map-Maker”: The High Desires and Colonial Fantasies of A.P. Coleman and J. Norman Collie in the Canadian Rockies, 1884-1908
Zac Robinson, University of Alberta

Knowing the St Elias Mountains through Science, 1949-1978
Peder Roberts, University of Stavanger

Resisting Toxic Futures: Settler Colonialism, Environmental Racism, and Community Activism
1:30 to 3:00pm, Hilton Boston Back Bay, Floor: Second, Prefunction

Listening to Fire Knowledges: Colonial Fire Suppression and Indigenous Cultural Burning in and around the Okanagan Valley
Judith Burr, UBC Vancouver

Energy flows, citizenship, and power: Narrating low-energy histories for just energy futures
1:30 to 3:00pm, Hilton Boston Back Bay, Floor: Third, Washington

“Just Common Sense”? Energy conservation in Saskatchewan as a response to the energy crisis
Justin Fisher, University of Saskatchewan

Electrifying Agriculture: Energy Flows and the Remaking of Irrigated Landscape in Socialist China (1958-1966)
Hongyun Lyu, University of Toronto

Low-energy, High-flow Agriculture: Animals and the Circular Economy in Canada, 1971-2021
Joshua MacFadyen, University of Prince Edward Island

Friday, March 24

Exploring Early Modern Ocean History
8:30 to 10:00am, Hilton Boston Back Bay, Floor: Third, Adams B

Moderator: Katey Anderson, York University

Health, Pollution, and Environmental Justice
8:30 to 10:00am, Hilton Boston Back Bay, Floor: Second, Board Room

Chemical Dispersions, Governance, and Justice in Late Twentieth Century Ontario
Rohini Patel, University of Toronto

Meat and Its Histories: The Origins of an Ecological Calamity
8:30 to 10:00am, Hilton Boston Back Bay, Floor: Third, Washington

Presenter – Rebecca Woods, University of Toronto

Environmental Resistance and Refugees
10:30am to 12:00pm, Hilton Boston Back Bay, Floor: Second, Board Room

Policing the Litani: Refugees and “Environmental Crime” in Lebanon’s Litani River Basin
Owain Lawson, University of Toronto

Indigenous Histories of Land and Resilience
10:30am to 12:00pm, Hilton Boston Back Bay, Floor: Second, Prefunction

Crop Restoration, Community Resilience: How History Helped to Guide Field Reclamation in Anishinaabe-Aki
Brittany Luby, University of Guelph

Saturday, March 25

Oil Art Imaginaries: Creating and Commissioning Extractive Worlds
8:30 to 10:00am, Hilton Boston Back Bay, Floor: Second, Mariner

Reading Economies of Extraction through Charles Comfort’s A Procession of Industry
Zannah Mae Matson, University of Guelph; Christopher Alton, University of Waterloo

Poster Session: 10:00 to 10:30am, Hilton Boston Back Bay, Floor: Second, Belvedere

Dreamscapes, A Triptych: Ecocultural Storytelling in Three Great Lakes Landforms
Lynne Heasley, Western Michigan University; Glenn Wolff, Northwestern Michigan College

Infectious Distempers, Contagion, and Environment: Partridge Island Quarantine Station 1830-1900
Erin Spinney, University of New Brunswick (Saint John)

Transforming British Columbia – The Westcoast Transmission natural gas story
Esther van ‘t Veen, York University

Northern Environments and Northern Borderlands
10:30am to 12:00pm, Hilton Boston Back Bay, Floor: Third, Adams B

Presenter – Isabelle Gapp, University of Toronto

Presenter – Heather Green, Saint Mary’s University

Presenter – Glenn Iceton, University of New Brunswick Saint John

Presenter – Mark Stoller, Queen’s University

Presenter – Mica Jorgensen, University of Stavanger

Moderator – Finis Dunaway, Trent University

Energy and Deindustrialization: Transitions in the North Atlantic, 1945-Present
10:30am to 12:00pm, Hilton Boston Back Bay, Floor: Third, Lincoln

The Lived Experience of Energy Transitions: Coal and Deindustrialization in West Germany
Petra Dolata, University of Calgary

The Rocky Mountains as an Industrial Zone: Remaking Landscapes through Energy Transitions
Liza Piper, University of Alberta

The ecological ghost acres of British industrialization in Eastern Canada
1:30 to 3:00pm, Hilton Boston Back Bay, Floor: Second, Mariner

The materiality of ghost acres : international trade and British consumption of timber commodities
Jim Clifford, University of Saskatchewan; Stephane Castonguay, UQTR

Ecological transformations of riverbanks in the port area of Québec City in the nineteenth century
Michele Dagenais, Université de Montréal

The ecology of the British food regime overseas: ghost acres in the agricultural landscapes of the St Lawrence Valley
Colin M. Coates, York University, Stephane Castonguay, UQTR

Tracing Animals in Time and Space
1:30 to 3:00pm, Hilton Boston Back Bay, Floor: Second, Prefunction

“No Right On This Side Of The Line:” Tracking the Geographic Queerness of C. latrans in American Print Media 1880—1915
Caroline Corinne Abbott, Network in Canadian History and Environment

 Feature Image: Bird’s eye view of Boston Common 1921.
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Daniel is an Associate Professor in the School of the Environment, Geography, and Sustainability at Western Michigan University. He is an editor for The Otter-La loutre and is part of the NiCHE executive. A transnational environmental historian who focuses on Canadian-American border waters and energy issues, particularly in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence basin, Daniel is the author or co-editor of five books on topics such as the St. Lawrence Seaway, border waters, IJC, and Niagara Falls. His newest book, Natural Allies: Environment, Energy, and the History of US-Canada Relations, was published in summer 2023. His newest book, an environmental history of Lake Ontario, will be released in spring/summer 2024 Website: https://danielmacfarlane.wordpress.com Twitter: @Danny__Mac__

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