Graduate Funding in History at the University of Saskatchewan – Environmental, Indigenous and Agricultural History

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Graduate Funding in History at the University of Saskatchewan – Environmental, Indigenous and Agricultural History

Profs. Cheryl Troupe and Jim Clifford are recruiting a graduate student to work on a SSHRC-funded project focused on the environmental history of settlement, agriculture and long-distance trade between central Saskatchewan and Britain. Student research will focus on the social and environmental history of settlement and agriculture in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, in a region where Indigenous peoples and Euro-Canadian settlers lived in proximity to one another and both worked the land, albeit in different ways and under different and often restrictive, policy initiatives. This research will be situated in the broader context of the global expansion of agriculture to feed cities like London, Liverpool, Manchester and Glasgow. Student training will include community-engaged oral history, Geographic Information Systems, and combining local and transnational scales of analysis. A PhD student is preferred, but will consider MA students. Competitive funding is available. For more information, contact jim.clifford@usask.ca and cheryl.troupe@usask.ca.

Indigenous children in front of a hay rake
[Aboriginal children in front of a hay rake] Adrian Paton Photos, Saskatoon History and Folklore Society
Feature Image: Image from the Saskatchewan Western Development Museum.
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Jim Clifford is an associate professor of environmental history at the University of Saskatchewan. He published West Ham and the River Lea: A Social and Environmental History of London’s Industrialized Marshland, 1839–1914 with the UBC Press in 2017.

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