Nature’s Past Episode 56: Animal Metropolis

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Episode 56: Animal Metropolis

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To kick off the 2017 Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences in Toronto, Ontario, I joined two of the editors of a new volume on histories of human-animal relations in urban Canada published by University of Calgary Press. Joanna Dean and Christabelle Sethna invited me to join them to discuss this new open-access book and to have a broader discussion about the history of animals and cities.

Listeners can download a free e-book copy of Animal Metropolis: Histories of Human-Animal Relations in Urban Canada right here.

Please be sure to take a moment to review this podcast on our iTunes page.

Guests:

Joanna Dean
Christabelle Sethna

Works Cited:

Dean, Joanna, Darcy Ingram, and Christabelle Sethna. Eds. Animal Metropolis: Histories of Human-Animal Relations in Urban Canada. Calgary: University of Calgary Press, 2017.

Music Credits:

“View from a Taxi” by Stefan Kartenberg

Photo Credit:

“May Contain Wolf,” as installed at the Tree Museum, Mary Anne Barkhouse, image courtesy of the artist

Citation:

Kheraj, Sean. “Episode 56: Animal Metropolis” Nature’s Past: Canadian Environmental History Podcast. 29 May 2017.

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Sean Kheraj is the director of the Network in Canadian History and Environment. He's an associate professor in the Department of History and associate dean of programs in the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies at York University. His research and teaching focuses on environmental and Canadian history. He is also the host and producer of Nature's Past, NiCHE's audio podcast series and he blogs at http://seankheraj.com.

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