Canadian Historical Association 2009

NiCHE has archived 16 presentations from this event. Thank you to Jim Clifford, Jason Young and Sean Kheraj for their work recording and editing the audio.

These presentations are a selection of talks given at Carleton University, (Ottawa, Ontario) that relate to Environmental History and Canada.

NiCHE has archived 16 presentations from this event. Thank you to Jim Clifford, Jason Young and Sean Kheraj for their work recording and editing the audio.

These presentations are a selection of talks given at Carleton University, (Ottawa, Ontario) that relate to Environmental History and Canada.


Citation: Kheraj, Sean. “A Multi-Species Metropolis: Managing Animals in Nineteenth-Century Winnipeg.” Canadian Historical Association Annual Meeting. 26 May 2009
Bio: Dr. Kheraj is a SSHRC postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of History at the University of British Columbia. He is also the producer and host of a monthly Canadian environmental history podcast called Nature’s Past. This conference paper is based on his current research project on the history of urban animals in Canada. For more information, please visit: http://seankheraj.wordpress.com
Abstract: This paper uses nineteenth-century Winnipeg as a case study to examine how early city councils managed urban animal populations in Canada. When the former frontier town was incorporated as a city in 1873, Winnipeg’s earliest city councilors created the regulatory architecture for the foundation of what was intended to be a new western metropolis and gateway to the Canadian prairies. Managing the city’s non-human animal population was a vital part of this city-building process. The earliest by-law regulations in Winnipeg demonstrate that the efficient management of urban animals for transportation, labour, energy, and food was a key component of making cities in the nineteenth century. Furthermore, the behaviour and autonomy of non-human animals in the past demonstrated the limits of human control. Stampeding horses, free-roaming cattle, and stray dogs shaped human actions and the making of Winnipeg in its early years.


Citation: Stott, Gregory. “Changing Expectations: The Transformation of Lake Huron Villages into Summer Cottage Communities, 1880-1930.” Canadian Historical Association Annual Meeting. 26 May 2009.
Bio: Gregory Stott teaches at Nipissing University in North Bay, Ontario.
Abstract: A study of the transformation of small nineteenth-century Lake Huron villages, which had previously hoped to become major port and manufacturing cities, into summer cottage communities.


Citation: Clapperton, Jonathan. “Who Knows Nature?: First Nations, the Environment, and Acceptable Knowledge.” Canadian Historical Association Annual Meeting. 26 May 2009.
Bio: Jonathan Clapperton is a Ph.D. student at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon.
Abstract: This paper raises questions about the relationship between the environmental knowledge of Aboriginal people and western scientific knowledge.


Citation: Parsons, Chris. “Jesuit Networks and French Knowledge of the Environment of New France.” Canadian Historical Association Annual Meeting. 26 May 2009.
Bio: Chris Parsons is a Ph.D. student at the University of Toronto in Ontario.
Abstract: This paper looks at early French Jesuit descriptions and understandings of the biota of the New France.


Citation: Van Horssen, Jess. “Body Politics in Asbestos, Quebec.” Canadian Historical Association Annual Meeting. 26 May 2009.
Bio: Jessica van Horssen is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Western Ontario in London, Ontario.
Abstract: This paper looks at the politics surrounding asbestos mining in Asbestos, Quebec.


Citation: Walker, Glenn. “The Curve Lake Ojibwas and the Fur Trade.” Canadian Historical Association Annual Meeting. 26 May 2009.
Bio: Glenn Walker, McGill University.
Abstract:


Citation: Sandwell, Ruth. “Empowering the Home?: Canadian Households Encounter Fossil Fuels and Hydro-Electricity, 1920-1960.” Canadian Historical Association Annual Meeting. 26 May 2009.
Bio: Ruth Sandwell is an Assistant Professor, Department of Theory and Policy Studies in Education, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE).
Abstract: This paper looks at how domestic electrification in Canada during the mid-twentieth century was limited by problems of supply and demand. It is part of a larger project that studies the ways in which fossil fuels in the home changed relationships in family life, society, and women and the environment.


Citation: Murton, James. “Handling Apples: Perishability and the Global Food Chain in the Interwar Period.” Canadian Historical Association Annual Meeting. 26 May 2009.
Bio: James Murton is an Assistant Professor, Department of History, Nipissing University.
Abstract: This paper examines how Canadian apple production interacted with world markets – specifically Britain – as part of the creation of a global food system.


Citation: Bavington, Dean. “Energy and Equity in Newfoundland and Labrador Cod Fisheries: Cultural, Social and Physical Thresholds and the Explosion of Energy Use in Fisheries” Canadian Historical Association Annual Meeting. 26 May 2009.
Bio: Dean Bavington is an Assistant Professor and Canada Research Chair in Environmental History, Department of History, Nipissing University.
Abstract: This paper looks at the disparities between scientific fisheries management and local fisherperson knowledge in the Newfoundland and Labrador cod fisheries.


Citation: O’Connor, Ryan. “The Air of Death and the Origins of the Environmental Movement in Canada.” Canadian Historical Association Annual Meeting. 26 May 2009.
Bio: Ryan is a PhD student at the University of Western Ontario. He is also one of the co-creators of the NiCHE Member Project, “Back to the Island”, an oral-narrative history of the back to the land movement in 1970s Prince Edward Island.
Abstract: This paper examines the public responses of Canadians to an important late-1960s CBC documentary on air pollution.


Citation: Clifford, Jim, et al. “Active History: History for the Future.” Canadian Historical Association Annual Meeting. 26 May 2009.
Bio: Jim Clifford, York University, Keith Jamieson, Wilfrid Laurier University, Geoffrey Reaume, York University and Robin Elliott, Murmur Toronto.


Citation: Weaver, Sharon Ann. “Rural Encounters: 1970s Back to the Land – Cape Breton, NS and Denman, Hornby and Lasqueti Islands, BC.” Canadian Historical Association. 26 May 2009.
Bio: Sharon Ann Weaver, University of Guelph.


Citation: MacFadyen, Joshua D. “Mennonites and Mixed Paint: Canada’s Flax Commodity Chain, 1878-1901.” Canadian Historical Association Annual Meeting. 26 May 2009.
Bio: Josh MacFadyen is a PhD candidate at the University of Guelph. His dissertation on flax fibre and linseed oil examines specialty crops, industrial growth, and environmental stresses in the Great Lakes and Great Plains regions.
Abstract: This paper examines Mennonites and their interest in flax cultivation, cultural separation, and self sufficiency in both Waterloo County, Ontario and the Manitoba West Reserve. It argues that these farmers grew flax for transnational markets through industrial systems and not because of cultural folkways. New markets for intermediate goods in manufacturing and urban construction stimulated demand for flax products such as cordage, rough textiles, and linseed oil for paint. Flax was not important in Waterloo or the West Reserve until non-Mennonite millers approached both communities directly and offered them contracts if they would start growing flax. Farmers also brought their own knowledge to flax production, taking some partially processed fibre home for cloth production in Waterloo and using flax as a way to increase productivity on new land in the West Reserve. Participating with industry and applying local knowledge in global markets allowed Mennonites to cultivate distinctive communities.


Citation: Piper, Liza. “State and Science in Shaping Community Life in Canada’s North, 1900-1975.” Canadian Historical Association Annual Meeting. 26 May 2009.
Bio: Liza is an assistant professor of history at the University of Alberta, and the leader of the NiCHE core group cluster, Early Canadian Environmental Data.


Citation: Bennett, Jason Patrick. ” From shiftless fruit tramps to a respected seasonal reservoir of people.” Canadian Historical Association Annual Meeting. 26 May 2009.


Citation: Robinson, Michael F. “Taking Wild Theories Seriously: a New Look at the Arctic’s Mythic Places.” Canadian Historical Association Annual Meeting. 26 May 2009.
Bio: Michael F. Robinson, University of Hartford.

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