New Scholars Committee is Recruiting

 Source: Wikimedia Commons


Source: Wikimedia Commons

Find out more about what the committee has to offer and how you can get involved.

Hi everyone! My name is Mike Commito. Earlier this month I succeeded Lauren Wheeler as theNew Scholars representative to the NiCHE executive council.

For those unfamiliar with New Scholars, it is a sub-group of NiCHE composed of graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and recent PhD graduates. We meet monthly from September to April, usually via Skype, to brainstorm project ideas and to discuss new scholar matters. My duties as the New Scholars representative will be to coordinate the committee’s activities and advise the NiCHE executive on new scholar issues.

One of my first orders of business will be to recruit some new committee members and get more people involved in the group. If you are interested in joining the committee please send me an email at commitma@mcmaster.ca, we would love to have you on the team. Please email me as well if you would like to be involved in the monthly meetings.

I am very excited to start this new chapter with the New Scholars and look forward to developing new and existing projects. Most of all I am eager to facilitate the construction of strong networks with other environmental history scholars across Canada and beyond. This group is an excellent way for us to stay connected over the course of the year, brainstorm research ideas, and of course, get to know our colleagues better.

I look forward to working with the existing committee and non-committee members of New Scholars and hope to have some fresh names and faces on board for the upcoming year. Have a great summer!

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Mike Commito is a PhD candidate in the Department of History at McMaster University. His dissertation focuses on the history of the relationship between humans and black bears in Ontario. He is interested in exploring the attitudes of hunters, policy makers, biologists, and the general public in order to understand how and why our perceptions and values towards black bears (and other animals for that matter) have changed over time.

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