All posts tagged (Un)Natural Identities

The Slocan Valley Community Management Forest Project committee. Photo: SVCMFP Final Report.

Slocan Man vs. Beer Can Man?: Gender, Work, and Environmental Politics in the West Kootenays

Editor’s note: This is the sixth in a series of posts considering the intersection between environmental history and gender history. The entire series is available here. “Hug a Tree, Hug a Lager.” This […]

Two boys cutting hay with two teams of horses, St. Michael's Indian Residential School, Duck Lake, Saskatchewan, unknown date. Credit: Library and Archives Canada.

Indian Residential Schools: An Environmental and Gender History

Editor’s note: This is the fifth in a series of posts considering the intersection between environmental history and gender history. The entire series is available here. I do not actually plan to […]

Docked canoe on Pog Lake in Algonquin Park. Summer, 2013.  Photo: Dan Cojocari (Wikimedia Commons).

“Will you be sick during the time of the trip?”

Editor’s note: This is the fourth in a series of posts considering the intersection between environmental history and gender history. The entire series is available here. In the fall of 1981 at […]

"Stumps," Galiano Island. Photo: Cate Sandilands.

“Stumps”: Jane Rule on Galiano

Editor’s note: This is the third in a series of posts considering the intersection between environmental history and gender history. The entire series is available here. Jane Rule (1931-2007) was a novelist, […]

R.V., "Forest, British Columbia, Canada," Flickr

“We made a strong statement for First Nations loggers, plus we put on a good salmon BBQ!”: Aboriginal Logging Sports and Masculinity in British Columbia

Editor’s note: This is the second in a series of posts considering the intersection between environmental history and gender history. The entire series is available here. Today, flannel-clad, axe-wielding, bearded […]

Tfinamore, "Down the Path," Flickr

(Un)Natural Identities: Unearthing Gender in Environmental History

Editor’s note: This is the first in a series of posts considering the intersection between environmental history and gender history. Subsequent posts are available here. These days I find myself […]